Disney Renaissance 2/Disney Revival

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Re: Disney Renaissance 2/Disney Revival

Post by EricJ » September 30th, 2019, 11:14 pm

That didn't stop Pixar, or its fans, from wondering Who Was Minding the Store.

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Re: Disney Renaissance 2/Disney Revival

Post by Ben » October 1st, 2019, 6:08 am

But, alas, we were all still but just customers.

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Re: Disney Renaissance 2/Disney Revival

Post by ShyViolet » October 1st, 2019, 3:37 pm

Short Iger portrait from NPR:


https://www.npr.org/2019/09/26/76432916 ... quiring-it


I find this passage particularly interesting:

In his book, Iger writes that managing the creative process requires both empathy and resilience. To turn Disney around, Iger set about acquiring other companies — starting with Pixar, the studio behind a number of animated classics, including Toy Story and The Incredibles.

Iger also struck deals to buy Marvel, Lucasfilm and, most recently, 21st Century Fox.

Also this:
“There's a culture and a way of life at the company that you've bought that sometimes can be integral to the creative process or the process of creating product at that company," Iger says. "And if you go about it in too heavy-handed a way, you can destroy spirit and culture and a sense of purpose — and in doing so, destroy the very essence of what you bought, or reduce value.



Yes, let’s enhance creativity at the Walt Disney company by buying label after label, the creative content of which bears no spiritual connection whatsoever with the original “essence” (to quote Iger) of what Disney (in one form or another) has been for so long.

So rather than hosting TV specials or visiting the parks to interact with employees or fostering a nurturing environment for the animators who work for him, Iger drones on and on (using nice friendly words) about how important buying these labels and leaving them alone so they bring in lots more cash is, rather than actually focusing on the company he’s the CEO of.

Or, as Iger himself said: “destroy[ing] the spirit and culture and a sense of purpose.” Ah, the irony. :roll:
“I want it all—the terrifying lows, the dizzying highs, the creamy middles!”

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Re: Disney Renaissance 2/Disney Revival

Post by ShyViolet » October 30th, 2019, 8:03 pm

Interesting (but should also be taken with a grain of salt, as it’s mostly speculation at this point) story on who might possibly succeed Iger when he leaves in two years:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... evin-mayer

“He’s a closer, he’s a benevolent killer,” said Michael Burns, a friend of Mayer’s and vice chairman at rival Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. “This could ultimately be the crown jewel at Disney.”
“Benevolent killer”. Yup, could just see him posing in photo ops with Mickey. I could be wrong but I’m pretty sure that CEO tradition will be gone by the time Iger’s successor—whoever he may be—takes the helm.

I also can’t help wondering, and I know this sounds insane, whether or not Mickey will remain the mascot for the company. It’s already lost so much of its identity that it almost seems quaint and outdated to keep that character as the worldwide face of the company. These characters may seem indestructible/immortal to us, but don’t forget they were almost lost in 1984, when Saul Steinberg was about to take over Disney and sell off its movies/characters piece by piece. Meaning Mickey could have ended up at one company, and Donald at another. I really hope whoever ends up succeeding Iger will have a better understanding of how vital these characters are. :?
“I want it all—the terrifying lows, the dizzying highs, the creamy middles!”

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