Cartoon Tolerance film

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Cartoon Tolerance film

Post by Special_Ed » November 18th, 2004, 12:10 am

"This is an unprecedented event: for the first time characters from all of the important kids' shows came together to appear in the same video," said Christopher Cerf,


I guess no one remembers that 30 minute program done in 88, 89, or 90 about drugs that featured a ton of characters from all the studios....

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Post by GeorgeC » November 18th, 2004, 1:16 am

Yeah,

People tend to "forget" things and rewrite history to suit their purposes.

There are tons of mistakes and historical fallacies surrounding animation.

Snow White & the Seven Dwarfs was NOT the first feature-length animated film produced; it was the first FULL-COLOR feature-length animated film, but NOT the first animated feature. That honor goes to the German silhouette animated film, The Adventures of Prince Achmed (late 1920s). (Snow White is still 100 times better, though...)

Steam Boat Willie is also NOT the first animated short with a soundtrack. (I'm speaking of a soundtrack with sound effects and voices, not organ/orchestra music.) Both Paul Terry and Max Fleischer released animated shorts with soundtracks but their shorts failed to have the impact Steamboat Willie did and were not synchronized to the animation.

Walt Disney was not the first animation producer to think of adding color to his cartoons but DID get exclusive rights (for around 3 years) to 3-strip Technicolor processes which made his cartoons look better than his rivals' shorts which were made with inferior color film stocks.

There were tons of animated mice characters before Mickey appeared.

Mickey Mouse was not the most popular animated character of the 1930s -- Popeye was.

The cat and mouse team of Tom & Jerry are NOT the original Tom & Jerry.

Gertie the Dinosaur is NOT the first animated film. No one is really sure what the name of the first animated film, but the latest animated films first appeared was around 1903 -- at least 10 years before Gertie appeared.

And the list can go on for the rest of the night....

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Post by Special_Ed » November 18th, 2004, 3:07 am

There were 2 other features even before Achmed but Achmed is all that exists in it's entirity.

Yeah, Mickey, along with most characters of the day, was not very innovative in design or concept. It was only because of the marketing genius of Walt that he caught on.

Who were the first Tom & Jerry?

I've seen some animated froms/footage that dated from 1897 too. Before that there was also a system used in vaudville that was purely animation where images were painted on clear strips of film and projected to backgrounds on the wall...hmmm, were these the first color films?

One problem is the teachers who teach this stuff. When I was in Animation 1 I knew more about the subject than the prof. He was too busy flirting with students to care about teaching accurate info.

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Post by Ben » November 18th, 2004, 6:13 am

Technically, Achmed is only 48 minutes.

Just thought I'd throw that one in there to stir things up... :wink:

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Post by Special_Ed » November 18th, 2004, 7:18 am

But isn't Saludous Amigos even shorter than that? 43-47 range...

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Post by Uli » November 19th, 2004, 7:31 am

Special_Ed wrote:Who were the first Tom & Jerry?
If i remember correctly, the first Tom & Jerry were actually a couple of kids. Five years ago the ARTE channel was airing a program called "Cartoon Factory". Along with many other pioneer-classics a few episodes of the "original" Tom & Jerry were showed. In one of them, those two kids were baby-sitters. I don't remember which studio was credited as producer, but the characters looked like Windsor Mc Cay's creations... or something.
Last edited by Uli on November 19th, 2004, 9:33 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Ben » November 19th, 2004, 8:45 am

Van Beuren's studio put out the original Tom And Jerrys.

In fact, DVD Toons just ran a review on a cheapo disc that's actually worth seeking out...and only $1.49 from Amazon!

The link:
http://www.dvdtoons.com/reviews/270

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Post by starlioness » November 19th, 2004, 4:12 pm

Ben wrote:Technically, Achmed is only 48 minutes.

Just thought I'd throw that one in there to stir things up... :wink:


personally , I liked Achmed better than S.W ;) no annoying voices for one thing and Subtitles are fun! :p ;).. though I do like Cartoons with sound ;)

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Post by Uli » November 22nd, 2004, 9:24 am

Ben wrote:Van Beuren's studio put out the original Tom And Jerrys.
Wasn't that the studio that also put out 'The Aesop Fables'?

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Post by Ben » November 22nd, 2004, 9:50 am

I believe that was Paul Terry's studio, which was across the street.

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Re: Cartoon Tolerance film

Post by ShyViolet » November 22nd, 2004, 1:46 pm

Special_Ed wrote:"This is an unprecedented event: for the first time characters from all of the important kids' shows came together to appear in the same video," said Christopher Cerf,


I guess no one remembers that 30 minute program done in 88, 89, or 90 about drugs that featured a ton of characters from all the studios....
I totally remember that! :o It's a part of my childhood. I'm pretty sure it was made in '90. It was called "Cartoon All-Stars to the Rescue".
At the time it was a pretty big deal. I watched it at home and in school when we didn't have to do any work.... :wink:

Also I remember when they showed it the first time, it was on every channel. (CBS, NBC, ABC, PBS)

Also, this may sound really weird but it's true--Roy Disney had the title of executive producer on this flick. Just check IMDB!
"That’s right, folks, it’s gonna be a Meg episode, stick around for the fun.
Here’s the clicker...no one’d blame ya.”

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facts

Post by ShyViolet » November 22nd, 2004, 9:03 pm

GeorgeC wrote:Yeah,

People tend to "forget" things and rewrite history to suit their purposes.

There are tons of mistakes and historical fallacies surrounding animation.

Snow White & the Seven Dwarfs was NOT the first feature-length animated film produced; it was the first FULL-COLOR feature-length animated film, but NOT the first animated feature. That honor goes to the German silhouette animated film, The Adventures of Prince Achmed (late 1920s). (Snow White is still 100 times better, though...)

Steam Boat Willie is also NOT the first animated short with a soundtrack. (I'm speaking of a soundtrack with sound effects and voices, not organ/orchestra music.) Both Paul Terry and Max Fleischer released animated shorts with soundtracks but their shorts failed to have the impact Steamboat Willie did and were not synchronized to the animation.

Walt Disney was not the first animation producer to think of adding color to his cartoons but DID get exclusive rights (for around 3 years) to 3-strip Technicolor processes which made his cartoons look better than his rivals' shorts which were made with inferior color film stocks.

There were tons of animated mice characters before Mickey appeared.

Mickey Mouse was not the most popular animated character of the 1930s -- Popeye was.

The cat and mouse team of Tom & Jerry are NOT the original Tom & Jerry.

Gertie the Dinosaur is NOT the first animated film. No one is really sure what the name of the first animated film, but the latest animated films first appeared was around 1903 -- at least 10 years before Gertie appeared.

And the list can go on for the rest of the night....
That is some REALLY interesting stuff. I never knew that about Snow White or about color films. Actually I think somewhere in the back of my head I remember seeing the Tom Jerry kids on some super-cheap cassette years ago....

That's fascinating about Popeye. It kind of makes sense because EVERYONE watched animation back then, not just children (sort of like nowadays). And Popeye had some adult-oriented stuff. Plus from what I heard the early Mickey-Minnie cartoons ("Plane Crazy"?) were kind of a failure.

"One problem is the teachers who teach this stuff. When I was in Animation 1 I knew more about the subject than the prof. He was too busy flirting with students to care about teaching accurate info."

LOL! :lol:
"That’s right, folks, it’s gonna be a Meg episode, stick around for the fun.
Here’s the clicker...no one’d blame ya.”

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